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How unplugging from tech can make you a better student

In the craze of the tech-charged 21st century, no wonder we are wired! Bombarded by 24/7 streams of content – from never-ending news cycles to social media platforms constantly flushed with posts all vying for our attention, our poor brains barely have a moment to relax.

Technology induced fatigue is an all-too familiar phenomenon of these modern times as is feeling like we can’t switch off, or get our head in the game. Moreover, these challenges can be particularly detrimental to a study schedule that deserves focus and attention. When we are plugged in for study, we need this time to be meaningful, not spent procrastinating and roaming the world wide web. Tech is certainly an ally when it comes to research and learning on the go, but there’s an important balance we all need to strike between time spent on and offline.

If the above is not enough motivation to take some time out from tech each day, then here are some essential reasons why unplugging from technology can make you a better student:

  1. A refreshed mind: just as spending hours trawling social media is unhealthy for the mind – and very often for the self-esteem – hours spent sitting online staring at your study on a screen is not good for the brain. Approach your time online – for social or study reasons – in short, productive bursts. Set yourself time limits for your online interactions so your engagements are meaningful and enable you to have some downtime to recuperate.
  2. Enjoy the land of nod: it’s been scientifically proven that the wavelengths from our devices negatively impact the hormone melatonin more than any other wavelength. Melatonin is essential for a restorative night’s sleep, so limit your tech-time before you hit the hay and banish any tech from the bedroom. Without a proper night’s sleep, you won’t be at your best when you hit the books.
  3. Stoke your imagination: have you ever noticed how much sharper your mind is after a good rest, and that fresh ideas come flooding in? That’s no coincidence. By creating some distance between yourself and your desktop, you’re giving yourself the chance to regroup and approach things with fresh eyes.
  4. Get your groove back: it’s completely normal to get into a bit of a funk at times with your study. Sometimes stepping away from your screen and taking a good break helps you to rekindle the passion that initially encouraged you to start studying.